Humanism in Schools

We live in a plural society in which more than half the parents of school-age children don’t identify with a religion*. At the same time, there’s great diversity between and within religious groupings.  Good quality education about religion, belief and ethics is vital, and Humanism is an essential component. That’s why the “Curriculum Framework for Religious Education in England 2013”, issued by the RE Council of England & Wales, recommends that Humanism should be studied in schools as an example of a “non-religious worldview”. Many local Standing Advisory Councils on Religious Education (SACREs) – including those in Richmond and in Surrey – specify its inclusion in their curriculum for community schools.

If you’re a teacher and would like a free visit by a speaker trained and accredited by Humanists UK, and tailored to your requirements, just click here.
For free downloadable resources, including lesson plans, classroom activities, presentations, videos, and humanist perspectives on a range of topics discussed in school, see the Understanding Humanism website. Teachers can also find guidance and information about CPD opportunities.

If you’re a school governor, a parent or a teacher and feel that your school would benefit from a visit from a humanist speaker, then please let the school know about this service. You can find a template email here, explaining why it is so important that young people have the opportunity to learn about Humanism.

The aim of school speakers is not to proseletise, or denigrate the existing beliefs of children or their parents. They are more than happy to speak at assemblies or  in interactive classroom discussions, either alone or alongside people from faith backgrounds.

There is a wealth of additional information available on the Humanists UK website for teachers, parents and students.

*British Social Attitudes Survey 2016: over 55% of people under the age of 55 answered “No” to the question: “Do you regard yourself as belonging to any particular religion?”